Fungi-filled fun

The fungi season has arrived a bit earlier than some years thanks to the combination of hot, dry weather in late June (it seems a long time ago) and then the cooler, wet weather since the kids broke up for the summer.  On Friday, I wrote in a Hedgerow Harvest Facebook post:

If you you’re a fungi fan change your plans for the weekend and head for your favourite fungi spots. The combination of really hot weather then lots of wet days means the fungi are going crazy. Where I live we have lots of grass fields and I am picking Field Mushrooms, Fairy Ring Champignon and Scarlet Waxcaps. The fungi forums are buzzing with photos of good quantities and a wide range of species of both grassland (Parasols and Giant Puffballs) and woodland (Chanterelles, Ceps, Horn of Plenty, Chicken of The Woods, Amethyst Deceivers, False Saffron Milkcaps and many more). Of course, it’s not just the good species that are about, I’ve seen photos of some of the Amanita’s including the deadly Destroying Angel.

On Friday evening, we took the dogs for a local walk. In the grasslands we found Parasols a plenty, some visible from a few hundred metres away! In the woods we found good numbers of Chanterelles and Hedgehogs but all far to small to pick. Being the beginning of the season we had good revision lessons with a possible gone over Death Cap, Brown Roll Rim, various Brittlegills and Porcelain fungus.

Top view of Parasol Mushroom - about 8 inches (20 cm) across
Top view of Parasol Mushroom – about 8 inches (20 cm) across

 

"Snakeskin" pattern on the stem and large, moveable ring - characteristics of a Parasol mushroom.
“Snakeskin” pattern on the stem and large, moveable ring – characteristics of a Parasol mushroom.

On Saturday, we stayed in West Dorset but went a little further a field, finding many of the above and one tree “covered” in Oyster mushrooms,  some very small Ceps (too small again), a Bay Bolete, a Red-Cracked Bolete and some Deceivers.

This fallen Beech was covered with hundreds of Oyster mushrooms.
This fallen Beech was covered with hundreds of Oyster mushrooms.

 

A few of these Oyster Mushrooms came home with us.
A few came home with us.

We couldn’t resit the call of the New Forest and headed there yesterday for a lovely walk through the open forest, heather-clad heathlands and wooded inclosures. Our first find was, at first glance, a lovely group of Ceps, but closer inspection revealed them to be the quite similar looking, Bitter Bolete. One of these in a pan will spoil all the “good stuff” so worth recognising! We soon met a couple with some nice “real” Ceps and a Scarletina Bolete. Encouraged, we soon found our first “real” one, some Chanterelles (a few pickable but “hundreds” too small), a few small Hedgehog Mushrooms, Blushers, Tawny Grisettes, Oak Milkcaps, Brown Birch Boletes, a Chicken of The Woods and many Common Yellow Brittlegills. The real find of the day was not an edible but a beech stump with a large number of pristine Lacquered Brackets. I think, there are only 307 records for these for the UK!

Bitter Bolete (not edible).
Bitter Bolete (not edible).

 

Penny Bin / Cep / Porcini - one of the best edible mushrooms. Drying intensifies the flavours.
Penny Bin / Cep / Porcini – one of the best edible mushrooms. Drying intensifies the flavours.

 

Blusher
Blusher

 

Chicken of The Woods
Chicken of The Woods

 

Lacquered Bracket
Lacquered Bracket

 

Porcelain Fungus
Porcelain Fungus

When we thought we had finished for the day, nearly back at the car, we found an area with lots of Ceps, many kicked over, we took a few. Finally, we got the wiff of a Stinkhorn and soon followed it to it’s source.

Some Ceps, Chanterelles and a few Hedgehogs went home.
Some Ceps, Chanterelles and a few Hedgehogs went home.

 

Stinkhorn
Stinkhorn

When you thought it was all over, this morning’s dog walk found the local Field Mushrooms have moved on to be replaced by one of my favourite’s – Horse Mushrooms.

Horse Mushrooms
Horse Mushrooms

We’ve had mushrooms as a side dish, a wonderful Risotto and there are Ceps to get in the dehydrator this afternoon. I’m looking forward to Battered parasols dipped in garlic mayo too!

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